Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Cultures

School of Design

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Phil Henry

Lecturer in Design Technology; UG Admissions Tutor

0113 343 3777

Clothworkers' Building South, Room 1.03

BSc (Manchester) PhD (Leeds)

Dr Henry obtained a BSc (Textiles Design, Design Management) from the University Of Manchester Institute Of Science and Technology (UMIST) and a PhD (Colour Software Development) from the University Of Leeds School Of Design. He worked for three years as a woven designer in the worsted industry before joining NedGraphics, specialists in the field of Computer-Aided-Design software development. He has a wide range of experience gained from over ten years consulting in the international textiles and fashion manufacturing industries and has extensive knowledge of bespoke design and coloration software as well as the related digital manufacturing technologies. He joined the University of Leeds in 2002 where his responsibilities include teaching textile design and design technology at the School of Design.

Biography

Dr Henry is a knowledgeable Colour and Design professional with an in-depth understanding of CAD/CAM for print and weave with a broad range of textiles and fashion industry experience. He was recruited to the School of Design in 2002 in the capacity of Instructor, was promoted to Teaching Fellow in 2005 and transferred to Lecturer 2008 and awarded his PhD in 2014. He has contributed to school administration and academic leadership by fulfilling the roles of, Exams Officer, as programme coordinator between an undergraduate programme jointly delivered between the schools of Colour Chemistry and Design, as well as temporarily fulfilling the role of Programme Manager for BA in Textile Design. His considerable textiles industry knowledge and experience of professional design practice has enabled him to make a significant contribution to teaching within the school.

His research is centred on improving digital design productivity and has resulted in the development of an original colouring plug-in tool for Photoshop that provides an intuitive method for designers’ to create and manage colour. (http://colourmimix.co.uk) Aside research, his responsibilities require an up to date knowledge of design, colour and print technology developments for the successful delivery of textiles and fashion undergraduate and postgraduate teaching. Within his varied career roles he has gained considerable experience of designing, implementing and training complex leading edge CAD CAM software solutions and related capital investment technologies to diverse UK and international textile manufacturing industries.

University of Leeds, School of Design – Lecturer in Design Technology
2002 to Present Day

  • Successful procurement of grant funding to support original PhD research into digital design and coloration technology, with the potential for significant educational and industry impact.
  • Attending and presenting innovative colour research to influential international colour and digital print conferences.
  • Member of the Colour Group, Create Group, editor for the SDC Colour and Design Journal, the Journal of Imaging & Technology, (AIC) International Colour Conference and the Study Group on Environmental Colour Design.
  • Introduced and integrated NedGraphics CAD software into the textiles design programme, maintained good working relationship with NedGraphics who have donated and kept updated forty Print studio systems.
  • Designing, managing and delivering academic education experience that support the transition of creative students into promising design professionals.

NedGraphics UK Ltd (Formerly Textile Computer Systems a UMIST Spinout Company) – Print Product Manager
1999 to 2001

  • Formulating major policy decisions for all elements of the design and colour software products for the printed textile manufacturing division.
  • Planning and implementing the company’s sales and marketing strategy, successfully taking new CAD CAM software products and digital sampling solutions to market.
  • Responsible for integrating new and existing product ranges as a result of the take-over of a major competitor company resulting in over $1million in software upgrade revenue.
  • Identifying present and future product opportunities and defining the direction of the product’s development.

International Sales Manager
1998 to 1999

  • Part of the team that turned £200,000 loss into a £250,000 profit over an 18-month period.
  • Qualified Far East Market leading to establishment of Hong Kong Office.
  • Organised seminars and road-shows with the assistance of local agents.
  • Trained and motivated new sales teams and agents in the Far East and Australia.
  • Successfully introduced CAD CAM product to new markets areas in mainland Europe and USA.
  • Organised and regularly attended important international exhibitions.

Sales Manager
1995 to 1998

  • Seconded as Sales Manager for the New York Office and subsequently promoted to position of UK Sales Manager.
  • Increased revenue by introducing new design focused CAD products and marketing ideas and implementing them on a global basis.
  • Established sales into three major John Lewis Partnership companies for print, weave and colour design to a value of over £250,000.
  • Supervised the implementation and software integration for new sites, planned and developed bespoke design and colour training and negotiation of maintenance contracts.

Sales Support Manager
1992 to 1995

  • Carried out cold-calls in order to qualify prospective clients.
  • Demonstrated the design and colour software at all levels and supported the international agent base both in their respective localities and at international exhibitions.
  • Responsible for pre-installation consultancy, product training and application support for the international customer base, ultimately progressing to UK key account management.

John Fosters Plc – Assistant to Corporate Division Sales Director
1989 to 1991

  • Enhanced existing design and development skills using self-taught CAD CAM skills (APSO).
  • Weave design experience of Worsted and Mohair suiting fabric, corporate wear and contract furnishing.
  • Gained understanding of bidding process by tendering for MoD and other Government contracts ultimately managed small Contract Furnishing Division.

Research Interests

A key research output is original colour design software developed as a PhotoShop plug-in, ColourMimix. The software has been several years in development supported a number of innovation grants and has the potential to generate financial returns for the university as well as a significant positive impact on the design industry and design education environments. For further details see:

Ongoing research interests include, experience design in relation to colour management, intuitive software interface design to encourage engaging-in-use, exploring the computer aided design as a medium for accelerated learning.

 

Teaching

DESN1560 Design for Textiles 1B

The module content is designed to introduce students to a wide range of visual research skills and to emphasise the importance of the concept of drawing, both in its broadest sense and in relation to the textile design process.

DESN1633 Colour and the Design Process

Colour is important to the decisions that consumers make about which products to buy. This module introduces the basic properties of colour and its representation and communication. The importance of colour in the design process is explored alongside the study of digital colour reproduction.

DESN2564 Design for Textiles 2A

This module will enable students to select and use a wide variety of textile media and techniques to realise personal ideas and adjust them appropriately for a commercial market.

DESN2565 Design for Textiles: Specialisms

This module is designed to give students a broad understanding of one of the textile design specialisms, and further develop the knowledge and practical competencies specific to their chosen area. Students will follow one of two specialisms, structured textiles or digital textiles.

DESN3566 Design for Textiles 3 – Specialisms

The objective of this module is to initiate and carry out an extended body of work which will result in a range of innovative finished design solutions. The module draws on visual research undertaken in the first semester and allows students to develop their ideas through to material outcomes.

DESN3630 Design Technology 3

This module provides an understanding of the use of colour as a vital ingredient in the design process and examines its positive effect on the product lifecycle.

DESN3635 Computer Aided Design and Professional Design Presentation

Developing the ability to maintain creative control when designing in the digital environment is the underlying module aim. Key to this objective is the identification of an individual design framework that may encompass a number of technology tools and techniques.

DESN3660 Independent Study Dissertation

The module provides students with the opportunity to investigate a subject area of relevance to their programme of study. The dissertation will allow the student to demonstrate coherent and detailed subject knowledge and should be informed by recent research/scholarship in the discipline.

DESN9004 Training in the Workplace

The aim of this module is to provide a structured work experience which will seek to enhance the student’s transferable skills and understanding of the chosen field of employment.

DESN5109M Digital Design Practice

Through lectures and practical classes students will be encouraged to develop a design consciousness, to understand how to develop design concepts and to formulate processes for bringing these concepts to life. Throughout, the key emphasis will be on the design process and digital skills within design practice.

DESN1560 Design for Textiles 1B

The module content is designed to introduce students to a wide range of visual research skills and to emphasise the importance of the concept of drawing, both in its broadest sense and in relation to the textile design process.

DESN1633 Colour and the Design Process

Colour is important to the decisions that consumers make about which products to buy. This module introduces the basic properties of colour and its representation and communication. The importance of colour in the design process is explored alongside the study of digital colour reproduction.

DESN2564 Design for Textiles 2A

This module will enable students to select and use a wide variety of textile media and techniques to realise personal ideas and adjust them appropriately for a commercial market.

DESN2565 Design for Textiles: Specialisms

This module is designed to give students a broad understanding of one of the textile design specialisms, and further develop the knowledge and practical competencies specific to their chosen area. Students will follow one of two specialisms, structured textiles or digital textiles.

DESN3566 Design for Textiles 3 – Specialisms

The objective of this module is to initiate and carry out an extended body of work which will result in a range of innovative finished design solutions. The module draws on visual research undertaken in the first semester and allows students to develop their ideas through to material outcomes.

DESN3630 Design Technology 3

This module provides an understanding of the use of colour as a vital ingredient in the design process and examines its positive effect on the product lifecycle.

DESN3635 Computer Aided Design and Professional Design Presentation

Developing the ability to maintain creative control when designing in the digital environment is the underlying module aim. Key to this objective is the identification of an individual design framework that may encompass a number of technology tools and techniques.

DESN3660 Independent Study Dissertation

The module provides students with the opportunity to investigate a subject area of relevance to their programme of study. The dissertation will allow the student to demonstrate coherent and detailed subject knowledge and should be informed by recent research/scholarship in the discipline.

DESN9004 Training in the Workplace

The aim of this module is to provide a structured work experience which will seek to enhance the student’s transferable skills and understanding of the chosen field of employment.

DESN5109M Digital Design Practice

Through lectures and practical classes students will be encouraged to develop a design consciousness, to understand how to develop design concepts and to formulate processes for bringing these concepts to life. Throughout, the key emphasis will be on the design process and digital skills within design practice.

Publications

Conference papers

  • Henry PM, Millwaters L (2017) Digital Colour from the Design Student Perspective. AIC 2017 Proceedings: to be confirmed (Accepted)

    Presented in this study is the first stage of a two year funded project conceived to develop a range of teaching-aids to better support students in their engagement with digital colour work. Identified in the initial investigation is the tendency for students to heavily rely on digital colour tools and the Internet for their initial colour research. Problematically, there is also a tendency for such research to be directed without considering the interrelated colour integrity issues; how individual colour judgments and the potential for hardcopy accuracy may be negatively affected by relying on digital sourced imagery. A novel aspect of this investigation is the evaluation of more accessible support guide, directed by design students for design students, that is less technical in its nature and is focused on how to integrate an understanding of digital colour in a way that has appeal for a designer. This encourages them to adapt their workflow to better fit the material capabilities of the printer rather than any exaggerated expectation perhaps driven by the technical colour capabilities of high-performance monitors/displays.

  • Henry PM, Westland S, Cheung TLV (2013) Colour selection strategies in colour design. AIC Colour 2013: Twelfth Congress of the International Color Association Proceedings: Proceedings of AIC Colour 2013: Twelfth Congress of the International Color Association The Colour Group (Great Britain).: 1157-1160.
    Repository URL: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/82910/

    Our evolving hypothesis is that a colour-picker interface designed to challenge the novice user will better connect with their creative abilities and help develop their understanding of the interrelated digital colour challenges. An interface approach underpinned by a philosophy of engaging-in-use rather than ease-of-use may help to better rationalize a new user’s colour-selection process, thus improving their initial productivity and creativity within the digital design environment. This study challenges the established HCI (Human Computer Interaction) convention that consistently prescribes to a user-interface-strategy embracing ease-of-use. It considers if this ideal is necessarily the right approach for creative software application, assessing colour-pickers as the primary example. Interesting results are emerging from experimental work with an early prototype colour-picker tool that exploits our ongoing research into intuitive understanding of colour. The focus of this work is the creative colour selection process and not colour management per se, however it is recognised that the relationship between these two design and technical processes is not always mutually exclusive.

  • Mahyar F, Cheung V, Westland S, Henry P (2007) Investigation of complementary colour harmony in CIELAB colour space. Midterm Meeting of the International Color Association Proceedings: Proceedings of the Midterm Meeting of the International Color Association 2007 International Colour Association.: 82-85.
    Repository URL: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/83854/

    This study is concerned with one aspect of colour harmony, the complementary relationships between colours. The relationships are most usually represented in colour wheels or hue circles such that opposite colours are assumed to be complementary. However, there is a lack of consistency if different colour wheels are compared. The primary focus of this work is to determine for each hue the optimal complementary hue using psychophysical experiments. The aim is to be able to define the complementary relationships between hues and ultimately to be able to produce a colour wheel that is specifically designed to represent these relationships. Experiments were conducted to ascertain the complementary relationships between hues. The null hypothesis was that opposite colours in CIELAB space would be optimally complementary, producing a maximal colour contrast. However, the experimental data showed systematic deviations from this hypothesis around the colour wheel. The results suggest that opposite relationships in CIELAB colour space do not accurately predict for complementary relationships. Of course, there are many different colour spaces from which we could attempt to predict complementary relationships. The results also indicated a curious asymmetry that merits further study.

  • Henry PM, Westland S, Cheung TLV (2006) An intuitive color-selection tool. The IS&T/SID's Fourteenth Color Imaging Conference Springfield, Va.: Society for Imaging Science and Technology.: 144-147.

  • Henry PM, Westland S, Burkinshaw SM, Cheung TLV (2005) How well can people predict subtractive mixing?. 13th Color Imaging Conference : 85-88.

    This study is concerned with the design of effective colour tools to allow users to quickly and accurately select a given colour in a digital-display environment. It has been shown that the choice of colour space (for example, RGB colour space compared with a more perceptually relevant space) influences performance (speed and accuracy) in certain colour-related tasks. 1,2 We suggest that the nature of the colour-mixing model may also be a factor in certain tasks such as the selection of a target colour from a colour-selector tool. It is our hypothesis that users have a more accurate internal model for how subtractive colour mixing works than for additive colour mixing. The purpose of this work is to determine whether it is indeed the case that observers possess better internal models for subtractive colour mixing than for additive colour mixing. In Experiment I the variance in observers' abilities to predict the result of subtractive colour mixing is compared using real physical samples and using a computer monitor (CRT). Although the variance obtained on the CRT was greater than that obtained using the physical samples, the difference was not statistically significant. In Experiment 2, the abilities of observers to predict subtractive and additive mixing were directly compared using samples displayed on a CRT Observers' abilities to predict additive mixtures were not as good as their abilities to predict subtractive mixtures (p < 0.05).

Software / Codes

  • Henry PM ColourMimix. Adobe.

    ColourMimix is innovative colouring software, designed as Photoshop plug-in. It has a unique interface that benefits designers in their understanding the of gamut issues inherent in digital colour workflows it also provides an intuitive colour mixing tool that mimics the subtractive properties of paint mixing. This highly original and user-centred approach challenges established colour management conventions by allowing the designer to engage with the problem of colour fidelity directly by using their critical judgement to characterise the colour-picker tool aligning it directly with the colour-capabilities of a selected printer.

Research Projects & Grants

  • 2013 Creative Industries Exchange: Awarded £500 to fund travel to meet with potential industry partners.
  • 2012 Clothworkers Innovation: Awarded £21,500 to further develop an intuitive colour-picker tool in to a viable commercial product.
  • 2009 Clothworkers Innovation: Awarded £8,000 to conduct a research project to develop a prototype colour interface and explore the commercial potential of the innovation.
  • 2008 The WD Wright Awards: Awarded £500 to attend and present research at CIC conference in USA.
  • 2007 Clothworkers Innovation: Awarded £2,000 to conduct a research project exploring intuitive understanding of colour.
  • 2006 Committee of the Imaging Science Group of the Royal Photographic Society: Awarded £500 to attend and present research at CIC conference in USA.
  • 2005 JB Speakman Travel Bursary: Awarded £500 to attend and present research at CIC conference in USA.

Links

http://www.colourmimix.co.uk

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