Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Cultures

School of Design

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Judith Tucker

Senior Lecturer; Deputy Director of Research and Innovation

0113 343 6928

Office hours: Wednesday 10-12pm

BA (Oxford) MA (Leeds) PhD (Leeds)

Biography

Roles and Leadership

2011 – present Senior Lecturer in the School of Design, University of Leeds
2006 – 2011 Lecturer in the School of Design, University of Leeds
2003 – present Co-convenor of LAND2 a landscape and visual arts research network
2006 – 2009 Visiting Research Fellow University of the West of England
2003 – 2006 AHRC Research Fellow in the Creative and Performing Arts
School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies, University of Leeds

Leadership experience

  • 2015 -2016 Deputy Head of School of Design, University of Leeds
  • 2016 – present REF leader for ‘Practice as Research’ group, School of Design, University of Leeds
  • 2009 – present. member of the School Management Team
  • 2009 -2015 Programme manager B.A. Art and Design, University of Leeds
  • Chair of School of Design Degree show committee
  • Co-convenor of Land2 research group
  • Co-convenor of Mapping Spectral Traces international research group

Membership of professional bodies and research networks

Invited member and on the advisory board for Contemporary British Painting

http://www.contemporarybritishpainting.com/

Co-convenor of LAND2 a landscape and visual arts research network

http://land2.leeds.ac.uk/

Co-convenor of Mapping Spectral Traces an international research network

http://www.mappingspectraltraces.org/

 

External Examining

PhD

Anglia Ruskin University 2017

University of Lancaster 2016

University of Gloucester 2015

York St John University 2014

University of Southampton 2008, 2010

MA

MFA Fine Art,  Wimbledon, University of the Arts, London 2016- 2020

MFA Art and Humanities, University of Dundee 2012 – 2016

MA Fine Art, Grimsby Institute affiliated with the University of Hull 2007 -2008

BA

BA Fine Art University of Nottingham 2015 -2017

BA Fine Art University of Chester 2010 – 2014

BA Visual Studies Norwich University College of the Arts 2008- 2011

BA Fine and Applied Art, Grimsby Institute affiliated with the University of Hull 2005-2008

Peer reviewer

Journals

Journal for Artistic Research: peer reviewer. JAR is an international, online, open access and peer-reviewed journal for the identification, publication and dissemination of artistic research and its methodologies, from all arts disciplines.

International Journal of Applied Arts Studies: peer reviewer an International journal is an open access and peer-reviewed journal which publishes original scholarly research papers in the field of Architecture, Arts, Urban Planning, Architectural Conservation, Restoration, Cloth Design, Graphics, Painting and Fashion Design.

 

Advisory roles

AHRC – Consultant for the AHRC Landscape and Environment programme

Advisory committee of Contemporary British Painting

Galleries Advisory Committee, University of Leeds

 

PhD Studentship assessor

PhD scholarship application assessor for British Federation Of Women Graduates 2010 -2014

WRoCAH AHRC studentships: Creative Arts panel 2014 -2016

 

Mentoring experience

  • Mentor for members of the REF research group ‘Practice as Research’
  • Mentor for recently appointed staff

Research Interests

My research explores the meeting of social history, personal memory and geography; it investigates their relationship through drawing, painting and scholarly writing. I consider my re-presentations of landscape’ in relation to Karen Till’s notions of spectral traces and Iain Biggs’ work on deep mapping as well as Marianne Hirsch’s considerations of ‘postmemory’. Most recently I have been working on commissions with the radical landscape poet, Harriet Tarlo: through the process of painting and drawing in relation to poetry, and in conversation with each other, each seeks to provide an enriched perspective on a specific place. I have also collaborated with the sculptor Deborah Gardner as artists in residence at Armley Mills Industrial Museum, Leeds.

I am co- convenor of LAND2. I run this creative practice-led research network with Iain Biggs UWE as a national network of artist / lecturers and research students with an interest in landscape / place-oriented art practice. Members of the network share a common interest in how art can engage with the possibilities and problems of landscape / place as it is understood today, while recognising the contested nature of both. The network meets for presentations of members’ work, has a web site at www.land2.uwe.ac.uk (that both represents the network and serves as an educational resource for those interested in practice-led research into landscape), undertakes occasional group projects, and organises conferences and exhibitions. We have recently forged international links with the University of Minnesota. There are several members of the School of Design who are members of LAND2.

I have been invited to be one of the artists in Contemporary British Painting: a platform for contemporary painting in the UK.

Teaching

I teach levels 1-3 at undergraduate level in both studio and theoretical modules and contribute to MA, MPhil and PhD at postgraduate level.

Undergraduate

Studio Practice 1A and 1B (Level One)

Studio Practice 3A and 3B (Level Three)

Contemporary Art and Memory (Level Two: Theoretical)

Landscape Place and Environment in Contemporary Art (Level Three: Theoretical)

Research Methods (contributor)

Independent Study Dissertation (contributor by subject)

Research

I welcome practice based PhD and MPhil applications in the broad arena of place, memory, identity.

Please see PhD and Postdoctoral Supervision for details of PhD student supervision, current and completed.

Publications

Journal articles

  • Tarlo H, Tucker J (2016) “'Off path, counter path’: contemporary walking collaborations in landscape, art and poetry”, Critical Survey. (Accepted)
    Repository URL: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/109131/

  • Tucker JA (2010) “On the Beach at Bornholm: Tourists, Soldiers, Artists”, Journal of Visual Art Practice Smith C; Mieves C; Cygan P (eds.). 9.3: 267-272.

    This essay explores the meeting of personal memory, social history, and a beach landscape. It is written from a practitioner's perspective, it proposes a progressive relationship with a particular place through the process of drawing and painting.

  • Tucker JA (2009) “Belated Landscapes: A Second-Generation Aesthetic Practice”, JOURNAL FOR THE STUDY OF BRITISH CULTURES Berg S; Emig R; Schmitt-Kilb C; Wiemann D; Sternberg C (eds.). Vol. 16.1/2009: 41-55.

    Presented from the perspective of a fine artist, this contribution focuses on the interface between the experiences of a first-generation German Jewish refugee who settled in Britain in the 1930s and her daughter’s (the author’s) engagement with her family history and position as a British-born diasporic subject. The article builds on the medium of landscape painting and the artist’s visits to places in Germany. These places had been ‘preserved’ in her mother’s childhood memories as well as on photographs, but continued to exist – both changed and unchanged – as the histories of the Third Reich, West and East Germany and post-reunification Germany unfolded. Through these transhistorical and (auto)biographical explorations a further set of interrelations become apparent, including the paradoxical associations of grief and mourning with tourism, leisure and visual pleasure. The article also provides an overview of other second-generation fine artists working in Britain today.

  • Tucker JA (2006) “Resort: re/visiting, re/visioning, re/placing”, Journal of Visual Art Practice. 5.1and2: 95-106.
    DOI: 10.1386/jvap.5.1and2.95/1

  • Tucker JA (2001) “Traverse”, Moving Worlds. 1.1: 23-31.

Chapters

  • Tucker JA (2012) “Brooding on Bornholm: Postmemory, Painting and Place”, In: Jones O; Garde-Hansen J (eds.) Geography and Memory: Explorations in identity, place and becoming. Palgrave Macmillan Memory Studies. Palgrave Macmillan.

    This chapter explores a ‘haunting’ of different kinds of landscapes: photographic landscapes in the family album, the contemporary dune landscape of Bornholm. It investigates what unresolved remainders might be discovered in this variety of landscapes. Written from a practitioner’s perspective this considers the implications of these residues for my most recent series of drawings and paintings Spectres on the Beach. It speculates whether and how the practice of painting might be employed in an affective understanding of place and explores what ghosts emerge when two landscapes: ‘real’ and its painted representations intersect. This chapter is informed by the work of sociologist Avery Gordon and geographers Jørgen Bærenholdt and Karen Till and is a development of my earlier work stimulated by pre-war holiday photographs informed by Marianne Hirsch’s notion of postmemory.

  • Tucker JA (2010) “The Lido in the Forest: Memory, Landscape, Painting”, In: Anderson E; Maddrell A; McLoughlin K; Vincent A (eds.) Memory, mourning, landscape. Probing the Boundaries. Amsterdam-New York: Editions Rodopi. 191-216

    This essay presents a consideration of the relationship between ‘landscape,’ memory and painting from a practitioner’s perspective and contributes to the aesthetic discourse about art after the trauma of the Holocaust. Painting, both as object and as process, has become a site for my investigations of loss, memory and mourning. I consider a triangular relation between three types of place and temporalities: pre-war photographs, a contemporary resort in the German forest and a new, third place between history and memory: representations of the former two through drawing and painting. I examine my recent series of works, Tense (2008), in which I re-present lido architecture in order to form a meaningful connection to the surrounding Thüringan forest. I think about this swimming pool architecture in the forest as bringing a domestic space outdoors and through this trope interrogate the uncanny in this landscape. I reflect upon the uncanny disposition of both the actual place and the painted place. While this series references photography, it also emphasises the difference between painting and drawing as a materialisation of the seen. I read my re-presentations of ‘landscape’ in relation to notions of ‘transposition’ and Marianne Hirsch’s considerations of ‘postmemory,’ and I also bring into play the implications of John Urry’s notion of the ‘tourist gaze’ and Anthony Vidler’s considerations of the ‘architectural uncanny.’ Through these explorations another set of interrelations become apparent including the paradoxical and anxious associations of grief to leisure and mourning to visual pleasure.

  • Tucker JA (2007) “Painting Landscape: Mediating Dislocation”, In: Becket F; Gifford T (eds.) Culture, Creativity and Environment: New Environmentalist Criticism. Nature, Culture and Literature. Rodopi. 197-213

    This chapter is framed by the two research questions: first, the problem of the diverse and complex ways in which ‘landscape’ can be viewed at the beginning of the twenty first century, and second, the problem of how the activity of imaging the ‘landscape’ through the activity of painting can relevantly continue to address that complexity. The thrust of this paper is to investigate how painting and ‘landscape’ might interrelate, how one can be the interface for the other, and what possibilities there are in the space that is created at this interface. The paper takes as its point of departure two encounters. One is with ‘landscape’ paintings, those of David Bomberg, and one with a piece of writing about ‘landscape’ painting, Griselda Pollock on Lydia Bauman. These serve as the foundation for a discussion, exploration, theorisation and positioning of Tucker’s painting practice. Her recent work is about location and dislocation. It evokes travel, distance and being in place, and reflects the shift between direct experience and memory. The paintings become concretised evidence of fluid events, reflecting both the land and those processes involved in the making. The form of this essay has evolved out of a methodology parallel to Tucker’s practice of painting: the issues have developed out of the painting/objects and the painting/processes, thus demonstrating how a very particular relationship with and understanding of ‘landscape’ might be imbricated in the creative process itself. This argument encompasses concerns that are both spatial and temporal: a consideration of Marianne Hirsch’s notion of postmemory is pivotable. What emerges through the dialogue between these theoretical concerns and the materiality of both paint and landscape are the fertile possibilities inherent within the site of painting for both viewer and maker. The series of associated exhibitions Caesura toured London, County Clare and Dean Clough

Conference papers

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H (2017) Poetry, Painting and Change on the Edge of England. The European Society for Rural Sociology Congress

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H (2016) Threadings, Bendings, Tanglings: Poetry, Painting and Place. "Wildness without Wilderness": The Poiesis of Energy and Instability

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H (2016) Place as Pause: the value of collaborative, cross-disciplinary practices in place. Lanscape Values: place and praxis

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H (2015) If you are that place: poetry, painting and land. ASLE UKI Green Knowledge Conference

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H (2014) Off path, counter path: contemporary collaborations in landscape. Of the Earth: Art, Photography, Writing and the Environment

    Keynote

  • Tucker JA (2012) Haunted landscapes: concrete, coast and canvas. ‘Forgotten’ War and Occupation Heritage: Shedding

    This paper explores a double ‘haunting’ of two kinds of landscapes: that of the contemporary beach landscape of Bornholm and the anxiety of influence in the landscape of post-war British painting. It argues that unresolved remainders of the Second World War can be traced in both of these landscapes. Written from a practitioner’s perspective it considers the implications of these traces for my series of drawings and paintings ‘Spectres on the Beach’. It explores what ghosts emerge when the two landscapes: ‘real’ and painted representations intersect. It speculates whether and how the practice of painting might be one ongoing relationship that the living might have with the dead. This paper is informed by the work of Avery Gordon and Karen Till and is a development of my work stimulated by pre-war holiday photographs informed by Marianne Hirsch’s considerations of postmemory.

  • Tucker JA (2012) Between Spectral Traces and Concrete Reminders:  a postmemorial landscape?. ‘Situating States of Mind’,

  • Tucker JA (2011) Haunted Landscapes: Concrete, Coast and Canvas.. Mapping Spectral Traces IV: Maynooth and Dublin

    This paper explores a double ‘haunting’ of two kinds of landscapes: that of the contemporary beach landscape of Bornholm and the anxiety of influence in the landscape of post-war British painting. It argues that unresolved remainders of the Second World War can be traced in both of these landscapes. Written from a practitioner’s perspective it considers the implications of these traces for my series of drawings and paintings ‘Spectres on the Beach’. It explores what ghosts emerge when the two landscapes: ‘real’ and painted representations intersect. It speculates whether and how the practice of painting might be one ongoing relationship that the living might have with the dead. This paper is informed by the work of Avery Gordon and Karen Till and is a development of my work stimulated by pre-war holiday photographs informed by Marianne Hirsch’s considerations of postmemory.

  • Tucker JA On the Beach at Bornholm: tourists, soldiers artists. Spectral Traces Symposium

Exhibitions

  • Tucker JA In the Open, Sheffield.

  • Tucker J Contemporary Masters from Britain.

  • Tucker JA Drawing nearer: lines of movement, lines of sound..

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H Tributaries 2.

    Project Outcomes/Highlights New original work emerging from the specific Holmfirth area. Commissioning work from internationally known writers/artists who live locally. Exploration of historical, social and environmental issues through artistic practice. Production of artworks and word-map pieces for display. Site -specific readings/talks from poet and artist. Performance work in local art spaces.

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H Tributaries 3.

  • Tucker JA Neverends Group Show.

  • Tucker JA Fitties.

    Solo show as part of Contemporary British Painting.

  • Tucker JA Tributaries 4.

  • Tucker JA In The Open. (Accepted)

  • Tucker JA Belair House London.

    Represented by Cavaliero Finn.

  • Tucker JA Battersea Arts Fair.

    Represented by Cavaliero Finn.

  • Tucker JA Summer Exhibition of Contemporary British Painting.

  • Tucker JA Project Fitties.

  • Tucker JA An exposition to accompany "Wildness without Wilderness" at The Poeisis of Energy and Instability..

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H Seeing Double.

    Residency and exhibition of open-form poems by Harriet Tarlo and monochrome drawings by Judith Tucker.

  • Tucker JA In the Open.

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H Behind Land.

    Culmination of 18 month Arts Council funded commission curate by Linda Ingham.

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H Behind Land: Poems and Paintings.

  • Tucker JA, Gardner DA Placing the Mill.

    Millspace Residency work by Deborah Gardner and Judith Tucker at Armley Mills, Leeds Industrial Museum. Drawings explore how to make connections to place in a very particular way: Tucker’s monochrome drawings on show here consider the spaces close to Armley Mill and edge around Gardner’s sculpture. Both the sculpture and the mill are implicit in the works: the space of the drawings operates in relation to both. Gardner considers the poetic potential in situating a miniaturised landscape within an enclosed world. The sculpture on show attempts to re-present Armley Mills and its aligning thoroughfares within the interior space of the mill itself, prompting a dialogue with Tucker’s drawing on ways in which we might experience, recollect and perceive place.

  • Tucker JA 30 x 30 x 34 A Group Exhibition of Small Paintings.

  • Tucker JA, Tucker JA shadows traces undercurrents. (Accepted)

    Exhibition Description shadows traces undercurrents is an exhibition co-curated by Christine Baeumler and Joyce Lyon, faculty members in the University of Minnesota Department of Art and members of the international artist/academic networks Mapping Spectral Traces and PLaCE. These networks are interdisciplinary associations committed to socially engaged creative practice. The artists have worked collaboratively and individually on projects that ‘map’ the unseen and unacknowledged pasts that continue to structure present-day social relations. They often work with and in traumatized communities, contested lands, and diverse environments. The shadows traces undercurrents exhibition features local, national and international artists working in a variety of media. The exhibition is associated with the Mapping Spectral Traces symposium and performances scheduled for October 18 and 19. For more information: http://www.mappingspectraltraces.org http://www.uwe.ac.uk/sca/research/place/index.htm

  • Tucker JA Bridges.

  • Tucker JA Resort.

    "Questions of origin, notions of memory and issues of loss have an impact on following generations. Judith Tucker’s recent body of work offers to bear witness to the consequences of displacement and exile through language of paint and the geographic metaphor" Gabby Novotny Only Atelier website. The exhibition was the preliminary exhibition in relation to my current research project funded by the AHRC Painting and Postmemory: Re/visiting, Re/visioning, Re/placing This research project aims to make a new alignment of the practice/discipline of landscape painting with theoretical research in postmemory. Through this realignment I attempt a more integrated perspective on different forms of second-generation memory that have become separated academically as objects of different disciplines. I showed oil paintings on canvas and notebooks made on location

  • Tucker JA Caesura: the small series.

  • Tucker JA Judith Tucker.

  • Tucker JA Postmemorial Landscapes: Places in Play/Mapping Spectral Traces.

    In Postmemorial Landscapes: Places in Play, I exhibit together for the first time paintings from two series that explore memory, place, and mourning: Tense and Spectres on the Beach. These two bodies of work—one based on the German Friedrichroda lido, the other on the Danish Bornholm beach—offer the viewer distinct ways to explore the paradoxical and anxious associations of violence with leisure and mourning through aesthetic pleasure. Friedrichroda in Thüringen, known as the “Green Heart of Germany,” is the town where my mother learned to swim and, coincidentally, where the 1936 German Olympic Team practiced. The existing pool is neither a ruin nor a site of destruction; indeed, while it mightbe considered a remnant of another era, it is actually rather well cared for. Historical photos of the pool and the surrounding forest bear the traces of unknown lives, just as the actual pool today, with its careful paintwork and the forest regrowth, do not. Thus in these works I deal with the notion of spectral traces in a way that is not straightforward; it is their very absence that is critical and might be recompensed through painting.

  • Tucker JA LAN2D: Beyond Landscape?.

    Curatorial Projects Lan2d Beyond Landscape? An exhibition curated by Judith Tucker and Iain Biggs. LAN2D was originally set up in 2002 as a network concerned to support innovative 2D art practice engaged with 'landscape', in its broadest contemporary sense, that drew on a range of disciplines and concerns so as to go beyond traditional landscape aesthetics.The exhibition and related conference were constituted the inaugural public event of LAN2D and were organised to facilitate LAN2D's aim of supporting artists involved in studio-led research by creating and maintaining a network for exchange, debate, research, exhibition, publication and mutual support among professional artists and interested academics associated with Higher Education. Catalogue Published by MakingSpace Isle of Wight PO32 6NS ISBN: 1 900999 20 X Associated conference Art 'after landscape': memory, place and identity 5-6 November 2005, Dean Clough, Halifax Papers to be published by JVAP 2005

  • Tucker JA Caesura 2.

  • Tucker JA Resort iv - vii.

    This series of exhibitions and accompanying texts will be the culmination of my three year research project funded by the AHRC in which I will address the following research questions which have developed through and in my painting-processes and my painting-objects: 1) What is the very particular relationship with and understanding of ‘place’ imbricated in the creative process itself? 2) How do contemporary notions of visual art, and in particular painting, as place-making and second-generation memory or ‘transposition’ interconnect? 3) What are the implications of this dialogue between the materiality of paint, the practice of painting and these theoretical concerns for extending the achievements of the discipline of painting The exhibitions will include paintings, drawings photographs texts and I will be full involved with the galleries' education programme.

  • Tucker JA Migratory Aesthetics.

    An exhibition of works by eleven artists about the movement of aesthetics and the aesthetics of movement: passage, encounter, change, interface, combination, departure, separation, relocation, displacement, loss, memory, revisiting, reconnecting, trauma and transformation. In varied ways and different media, each by means of their own singular artistic strategy, they explore the aesthetic dimension of migration histories. They demonstrate that artistic practice generates knowledge of the migratory at many levels: ideas, pain, people, art forms, language, memory. Three themes play through the work assembled here. Martine Attile, Mieke Bal, Sutapa Biswas, Bracha Ettinger, Lubaina Himid, Isaac Julien, Lily Markiewicz, Fanozi Chickenman Mhkize, Roger Palmer, Ingrid Pollard, Judith Tucker.

  • Tucker JA Painting Lives.

    Contemporary women artists Angie de Coucy Bower, Victoria Brookland, Jane Kenelly and Judith Tucker show alongside paintings by women artists from the Harrogate Fine Art Collection. Curator Jane Sellars.

  • Tucker JA Triform.

  • Tucker JA Crossing.

  • Tucker JA Caesura.

    Caesura. Painting, landscape, mediating and dislocation, these four words, have underpinned my thinking throughout. I have considered the words in a number of permutations, sometimes singly, sometimes in pairs and sometimes all together. Through those considerations this project remains framed by the two research questions: first, the problem of the diverse and complex ways in which ‘landscape’ can be viewed at the beginning of the twenty first century, and second, the problem of how the activity of imaging the ‘landscape’ through the activity of painting can relevantly continue to address that complexity. Inevitably the main focus of my investigations has been on the many potential interrelations between painting and ‘landscape’ and the various possibilities that might occur at this interface. These have included possibilities for both viewer and maker.

  • Tucker JA Resort ii.

    This exhibition demonstrated a development of ideas inherent in Resort in relation to my current research project funded by the AHRB Painting and Postmemory: Re/visiting. 'In Tucker’s best work, such notions – far from being intellectualised - are so completely embodied in the physicality of the painted surface, that medium and message become inseparable. As always, Tucker displays great technical inventiveness and skill: gold leaf, marble dust and pearlescent pigments combine with a whole array of glazing agents and varnishes, their smoothness sometimes disrupted by the application of methylated spirits and water, to create surfaces that are both seductive and tantalizing. Also striking is the way in which these surfaces look quite different in different lights – an effect that Tucker herself is well aware of, seeing it as a fitting metaphor for the workings of memory.' Monica Bohm Duchen 2004 ,

  • Tucker JA On the Beach at Bornholm. (Accepted)

    An exhibition of photographs exploring a landscape painting practice. Artist Statement to accompany show: The Danish island Bornholm has long been known for its particular mix of tourist idyll and strategic military history. Sitting in the middle of the Baltic, the beaches of Bornholm might be seen as sites of both “jouissance” and danger. During the 1920s and 1930s, it was an alternative to the Mediterranean for German tourists; later, when it was occupied by Germany relatively early in the Second World War, the island served as a lookout post and listening station. Several concrete coastal installations were built during this period but are now neglected, sitting in close proximity to holiday homes. These remnants of the Third Reich have become the subjects of this work, they operate at the same time as uncanny doubles of the holiday homes away from home and as what Edward Casey might term unresolved remainders of memory. My new work explores these visual remnants of past military activity that interrupt and disturb the holiday resort. Stubborn lumps of concrete—remains of a former U-Boat station—lie unnoticed amongst the rocks and sea birds along the shoreline. Past the dunes, large concrete structures remain nestled in the woods among the picturesque holiday homes. One, a gun emplacement—a wartime ruin that was never used—is now a space for tourist exploration and play. This rocket launcher made me think of the so-called Scandinavian ghost rockets, one of which is supposed to have crashed on the island in 1946. Whether these ghost rockets were the result of meteorite storms or came from Soviet-occupied East Germany, from the island of Peenemunde, remains a matter of debate. Columnist Marquis Childs suggested that sightings of spectral rockets were a kind of collective neurosis. As he wrote in Washington Calling in 1946: “The most extraordinary phenomenon of post-war Europe is the report of flying bombs or rockets that are now beginning to come from widely separated areas. If they are real, then we have a small taste of what the next conflict will be like. If they are a mere illusion, then we have an example of the uneasy state of mind of the people who live on this troubled continent.” My paintings and drawings invite questions about the paradoxical relation between those solid concrete remains and implicitly, these stories of collective ghosts.

  • Tucker JA Tense.

    The exhibition Tense is concerned with a triangular relation between three places and times: holiday photographs from a pre-war family album, a swimming pool in a resort in the Thüringan forest in the twenty-first century and a new, third place between history and memory: re-presentations of the former two through drawing and painting. All three places offer spaces for projection. There are two series: one of monochrome drawings, the other, a parallel series of paintings employs a strategic use of iridescent pigments. While these series both reference photography, they also emphasise the difference of painting and drawing as a materialisation of the seen, however, the crucial aspect of these works is an attempt to find forms for a fading history.

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H, Gardner D, Biggs I, Rose M Landscape, Art and Uncertainty.

    This timely exhibition revisits possibilities of landscape and place for contemporary British artists. Four artists from the research network Land2 respond to gallery’s extensive collection, considering significant works from the neo-romantic period alongside contemporary artists’ work. These include Graham Sutherland, Peter Lanyon, Paul Nash and contemporary artist Clare Woods and George Shaw The work of neo-romantic artists has unexpected resonances today in our very different digital and global world. There are unexpected parallel concerns: in periods of transformation, change and potential loss how can a revisiting of the genre of landscape be radical? The works of Iain Biggs, Deborah Gardner, Melanie Rose and Judith Tucker in collaboration with the poet Harriet Tarlo offer considerations of this question in a variety of ways. They reflect on landscape, both urban and rural, place, nature, and human interventions in environment, past and present in our uncertain world.

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo HAB Tributaries: An exhibition of poems and monochrome drawings by Harriet Tarlo and Judith Tucker. A Holmfirth Arts Festival commission..

    Open-form poems by Harriet Tarlo and monochrome drawings by Judith Tucker An interim showing of work from a two year collaborative project Since October 2011, we have been collaborating on a series of walks around the tributaries of the Holme River. We found our focus in the land above Digley reservoir below Black Hill, Wessenden Head and Good Bent End where becks such as Hey Clough, Black Dike, Dean Clough and Reap Hill Clough merge and flow down to the reservoir. We are exploring the intricate convergences of these tributaries as they run counter to the old roads, sheep-trails and pathways that cross the landscape. To the casual visitor this place seems a natural wilderness, but there’s a hidden landscape here – traces remain of valleys once alive with the sound of quarries, mills and farms. Our work conveys a sense of the symbiotic shaping of land and water both by each other and by human interventions, as well as our own conversations with the landscape and with each other. As our collaboration moves into its second year, we shall engage further with the changing of the seasons. Harriet Tarlo is a poet and academic living in the Holme Valley. Poetry publications include Poems 1990-2003 (Shearsman 2004); Nab (etruscan 2005) and Field (forthcoming). She is editor of the “Women and Eco-Poetics” feature, How2 Vol 3: No 2 and The Ground Aslant: An Anthology of Radical Landscape Poetry (Shearsman, 2011). She teaches at Sheffield Hallam University where she is Course Leader for M.A. Writing. Judith Tucker is an artist and academic living in the Holme valley. She has exhibited widely both in the UK and abroad. Recent exhibition venues include London, Brno, Czech Republic, Vienna, Austria, Minneapolis USA and Virginia USA, as well as regional galleries throughout the UK. In addition to being an artist she spends part of her time at the University of Leeds where she is Senior Lecturer in the School of Design.

  • Tucker JA Close to Home:artists reconsider the local An exhibition and symposium to celebrate ten years of the network Land2..

    Close to Home | 11 – 30 July An exhibition and symposium to celebrate ten years of the network Land2. A collaboration between Land2, East Street Arts and the School of Design, University of Leeds Venue: Patrick Studios St Mary’s Lane, Leeds LS9 7EH. THE EXHIBITION Dates and Times: Wednesday 11th July – Monday 30th July (Monday to Friday 12pm – 6pm) This exhibition is a development of network Land2′s ongoing research into how art practices might contribute to a nuanced understanding of specific places and their communities. All the artists in this exhibition engage with places in their immediate vicinity. The works on show offer ways to make sense of the complexity of experiences, histories and activities in these localities. There is an interrogation of the quotidian, the everyday, the familiar, the marginalised and the unnoticed. Iain Biggs, Clare Burnett, Anne-marie Creamer, Gail Dickerson,Phillipa Dobson Anne Eggebert, Hondartza Fraga, Sheila Gaffney,Deborah Gardner John.Harper, Lily Markiewicz, Paddy McEntaggart, Mick McGraw, Mary Modeen Melanie Rose, Jane Rushton, Matthew Shelton, Harriet Tarlo, Andrea Thoma Rebecca Thomas, Patricia Townsend, Susan Trangmar, Judith Tucker David Walker Barker, Paul Wilson

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H Art et Géographie,.

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H Ecopoetics Exhibition "The Trembling Grass".

    The Trembling Grass is a mixed-media exhibition crossing the borders between poetry, the visual arts and ecology. Taking place in the 150th anniversary year of the death of the poet John Clare and named after a line from his poem 'To the Snipe,' it highlights conflicts between nature and humankind caused by climate change and the depletion of natural resources. Featuring ten UK and US poets including Allen Fisher, Maggie O'Sullivan, Harriet Tarlo, Kristin Prevallet, Carol Watts and more, the exhibition focuses on themes of oil, soil, water and wood and includes mixed-media poems ranging from paper and plants pulped together, to texts that have swum rivers and turned into oil; all documenting and performing a diverse range of environmental actions and response.

  • Tucker JA The Priseman-Seabrook Collection of 21st Century British Painting.

    The Priseman Seabrook Collection of painting highlights work produced by artists practicing in Britain in the 21st Century

  • Tucker JA @PaintBritain.

    A new collection of contemporary British painting by 45 different artists from across the UK. A specific 21st century painting collection it includes work by Pollock-Krasner awardee Kelly Jayne, John Moores Prize winner Nicholas Middleton, British Academy awardee James Quin, Wyss Foundation prize winner Harvey Taylor, Alex Hanna, Matthew Krishanu, Arts Council awardee Simon Carter and East London Painting Prize winner Nathan Eastwood. The collection was established by artists Robert Priseman and Simon Carter when they started to ask the question 'Who today is painting in Britain?' This new exhibition brings these important and innovative artists together for the very first In their work we find visual conversations between their peers, the painters of the past and the complex social interactions of the new millennium. It will also be the first time that 20th century paintings from the Ipswich collection have been shown in the Art School Gallery.

  • Tucker JA Evocations: paintings and drawings. Judith Tucker.

    The recent series of drawings and paintings evolved after the discovery of photographs belonging to her mother who escaped Germany as a child in the 1930's. Holiday photographs of lidos and beaches inspired Judith to explore the landscapes that her family had visited and she became fascinated by the environment as a powerful metaphor for displacement, a sense of un-belonging, of searching for home. Paintings and Drawings by Judith Tucker "...coasts, beaches and latterly the spaces of lido architecture, interrogate the uncanny in landscape, and I would consider that my paintings and drawings contribute in some small way to the aesthetic discourse about art after the trauma of the Holocaust. I read my re-presentations of landscape in relation to notions of ‘transposition’ and against Marianne Hirsch’s considerations of ‘postmemory’." The works evidence the search to make sense of her 'postmemory', to discover a past that is familiar, and yet not directly experienced. During the 1970's, it was recognised that the experience of being a survivor or refugee of the Holocaust seeped into the emotional and psychological spaces of the next generation. 'Transposition', the intergenerational transmission of trauma, is known to create a legacy in the psychic space of the child. The child carries something unknown, something from the past, shapeless, but present in their innermost being. Judith Tucker's paintings and drawings are finely balanced symmetries of darkness and light, vertical and horizontal planes, environments inhabited by figures or devoid of them. She obsessively and repeatedly describes moments that, to the casual observer, appear very similar. Her eye selects, like a camera lens, and settles on a viewpoint. In another image, the viewpoint shifts slightly, a different perspective emerges, the pictorial space changes. Drawing and painting is a process of unravelling meaning, discovering memory, discovering spaces where voices and sounds, unseen and unknown, seem to echo from faraway. They are still images, frozen moments from another era, re-presented, re-visited, reclaimed.

  • Tucker JA Evocations: paintings and drawings. Judith Tucker.

    The recent series of drawings and paintings evolved after the discovery of photographs belonging to her mother who escaped Germany as a child in the 1930's. Holiday photographs of lidos and beaches inspired Judith to explore the landscapes that her family had visited and she became fascinated by the environment as a powerful metaphor for displacement, a sense of un-belonging, of searching for home. Paintings and Drawings by Judith Tucker "...coasts, beaches and latterly the spaces of lido architecture, interrogate the uncanny in landscape, and I would consider that my paintings and drawings contribute in some small way to the aesthetic discourse about art after the trauma of the Holocaust. I read my re-presentations of landscape in relation to notions of ‘transposition’ and against Marianne Hirsch’s considerations of ‘postmemory’." The works evidence the search to make sense of her 'postmemory', to discover a past that is familiar, and yet not directly experienced. During the 1970's, it was recognised that the experience of being a survivor or refugee of the Holocaust seeped into the emotional and psychological spaces of the next generation. 'Transposition', the intergenerational transmission of trauma, is known to create a legacy in the psychic space of the child. The child carries something unknown, something from the past, shapeless, but present in their innermost being. Judith Tucker's paintings and drawings are finely balanced symmetries of darkness and light, vertical and horizontal planes, environments inhabited by figures or devoid of them. She obsessively and repeatedly describes moments that, to the casual observer, appear very similar. Her eye selects, like a camera lens, and settles on a viewpoint. In another image, the viewpoint shifts slightly, a different perspective emerges, the pictorial space changes. Drawing and painting is a process of unravelling meaning, discovering memory, discovering spaces where voices and sounds, unseen and unknown, seem to echo from faraway. They are still images, frozen moments from another era, re-presented, re-visited, reclaimed.

  • Tucker JA Spectres on the Beach in conjunction with the international symposium ‘Catchment/PLaCE Mapping Spectral Traces’ workshop and symposium with related solo and group exhibitions; host institution: PLaCE Research Centre, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK. Organized by Iain Biggs and Mel Shearsmith.

    Spectres on the Beach: Judith Tucker Artist Statement The Danish island Bornholm has long been known for its particular mix of tourist idyll and strategic military history. Sitting in the middle of the Baltic, the beaches of Bornholm might be seen as sites of both “jouissance” and danger. During the 1920s and 1930s, it was an alternative to the Mediterranean for German tourists; later, when it was occupied by Germany relatively early in the Second World War, the island served as a lookout post and listening station. Several concrete coastal installations were built during this period but are now neglected, sitting in close proximity to holiday homes. These remnants of the Third Reich have become the subjects of Spectres; they operate at the same time as uncanny doubles of the holiday homes away from home and as what Edward Casey might term unresolved remainders of memory. My new work explores these visual remnants of past military activity that interrupt and disturb the holiday resort. Stubborn lumps of concrete—remains of a former U-Boat station—lie unnoticed amongst the rocks and sea birds along the shoreline. Past the dunes, large concrete structures remain nestled in the woods among the picturesque holiday homes. One, a gun emplacement—a wartime ruin that was never used—is now a space for tourist exploration and play. This rocket launcher made me think of the so-called Scandinavian ghost rockets, one of which is supposed to have crashed on the island in 1946. Whether these ghost rockets were the result of meteorite storms or came from Soviet-occupied East Germany, from the island of Peenemunde, remains a matter of debate. Columnist Marquis Childs suggested that sightings of spectral rockets were a kind of collective neurosis. As he wrote in Washington Calling in 1946: “The most extraordinary phenomenon of post-war Europe is the report of flying bombs or rockets that are now beginning to come from widely separated areas. If they are real, then we have a small taste of what the next conflict will be like. If they are a mere illusion, then we have an example of the uneasy state of mind of the people who live on this troubled continent.” My paintings and drawings invite questions about the paradoxical relation between those solid concrete remains and implicitly, these stories of collective ghosts.

  • Tucker JA Space, Place, and Spectral Trace: An International Exposition.

    Curated by: Christine Baeumler * Group exhibition, with recent works by: Suze Adams, Christine Baeumler, Jane Bailey, Iain Biggs, Margaret Cogswell, Julian Gregg, Lynn Imperatore, Rob Irving, Gülgün Kayim, Claire King, Davina Kirkpatrick, Rebecca Krinke, Joyce Lyon, Antony Lyons, Mary Modeen, Mel Shearsmith, David Smith, Mona Smith, Penny Somerville, Judith Tucker

  • Tucker JA, Ingham L, Kenton Webb R, Leigh J, Ainley D The Nature of Landscape: Visions & Distillations of Landscape & Place.

    The Nature of Landscape: Visions & Distllations of Landscape and place, is a coming-together of four outstanding artists for whom landscape is their main concern, and a group of artists who are using this thematic to inform and challenge their current work (The Abbey Walk Gallery Artists). Introduced by prof. Stephen Newton, curated by Linda Ingham. This accompanying contains visual work and theoretical essays by David Ainley, Jeremey Leigh, Judith Tucker, and Richard Kenton Webb, as well as an essay by composer David Power, and work by the Abbey Walk Gallery Artists

  • Tucker JA All Over the Place: Drawing Place, Drawing Space.

    Recent drawings by 17 artists in the group LAND2 and the Drawing Research Group (Lincoln) explore the relationship between the act of drawing and the experience of place. LAND2 is a national, creative practice-led research network of artists, lecturers and students with an interest in contemporary landscape and place-oriented art practice. # Further information about the artists: # Catherine Baker (Norwich University College of the Arts) # Iain Biggs (University of the West of England) # Jayne Bingham # Anne-Marie Creamer # Paul Edwards (University of Lincoln) # Paul Fieldsend-Dank (Norwich University College of the Arts) # Deborah Gardner (University of Leeds, School of Design) # Polly Gould (Central Saint Martins School of Art and Design) # Mick McGraw (Glasgow School of Art) # John Plowman (University of Lincoln, School of Art and Design) # Gillian Robertson # Doris Rohr (University of Ulster, Art and Design Research Institute) # Dan Shipsides, (University of Ulster, Art and Design Research Insitute) # Emma Stibbon profile (University of Brighton, Centre for Research and Development) # Andrea Thoma (University of Leeds School of Design) # Judith Tucker (University of Leeds, School of Design) # David Walker-Barker (University of Leeds, School of Design)

  • Tucker JA Revisiting the Beach organized as part of the international conference at Newcastle University,.

    Revisiting the Beach The beach is often described as a hybrid space, which lies outside the social and ontological restraints, where different orders or value systems collide. Geographically, the beach represents a transgression between land and sea, while culturally it may stand for a similar infringement of boundaries. In19th century art production, the beach appeared as a romantic trope related to a sublime experience. Similarly European and North American bourgeois society imagined itself depicted at the beach as a new site of leisure, liberated from social norms and restraints. For centuries Beach settings have been key to some of dramatically-charged narratives that have reached mass audiences, from the18th century readers of Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (1719) through to today’s television audiences of programmes such as Shipwreck (UK Channel 4), Lost (USA ABC) or popular films such as The Beach (dir. Danny Boyle, 2000). All these narratives illustrate how society perceives the beach as a site of both ‘jouissance’ and danger. The exhibition sets out to revisit the common perception of the beach as place of transition and simultaneous pleasure and risk in contemporary art production. This exhibition, outlined as a group show representing eight contemporary artists of different fields raises the question to which extent the beach as cultural signifier still assumes a crucial place in contemporary society. A diverse group of works (video art, painting, drawing, sculpture) will offer a current view on the disruptive and productive qualities of the clash of two spheres: the conflict of geographical entities but also different visions of the world: modernity versus tradition, chaos versus order. The exhibition showcases recent work by Irene Brown, Jane Darke, John Fox, Cath Keay, Christian Mieves, Salma Nathoo, Sophie Jung, Judith Tucker. The Exhibition is organized as part of the international conference at Newcastle University, which took place on 3 July 2009. The conference is organized by Christian Mieves and Philippe Cygan (Departments of Fine Art and English Studies at Newcastle University). The Exhibition has been supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), Newcastle Institute for the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (NIASSH) and the School of Arts and Cultures, Newcastle University.

  • Tucker JA Directions in Drawing,.

  • Tucker JA Fieldwork: an exhibition exploring concepts of place and landscape.

    An exhibition exploring concepts of place and landscape Our first exhibition of 2009 is work resulting from a fieldtrip to Mull in 2008 by artists network, Land2. The work, including photography, film, drawing and sculpture, explores how art can engage with the problems and possibilities of place and landscape. Featuring work by Iain Biggs, Judith Tucker, David Walker-Barker, Lily Markiewicz, Jane Millar, Gail Dickerson, Claire King, Ray Lafferty, Josh Biggs and Suze Adams

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H Behind Land: Excavations & Estuaries.

    Behind Land: Excavations & Estuaries Judith Tucker, Harriet Tarlo, David Walker Barker, David Ainley, Linda Ingham! ! Drawn together from Yorkshire, Lincolnshire and Derbyshire, the artists and artworks observe aspects of mining, geology and process, along with the lived-in and worked-upon or through landscape, both inland and coastal. Since 2013, artist Judith Tucker and poet Harriet Tarlo have been in collaboration on a body of work which focuses upon a short stretch of the coastal landscape of the south bank of the Humber estuary. The current show draws together the artists from the first Excavations & Estuaries show, displaying works of geological and geographical richness which consider the nature of landscape and place in contemporary visual arts and academic circles.

Others

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H 'Excavations and Estuaries' public talk at Usher Gallery.

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H 'Outfalls: Lines of navigation' talk at Neverends Symposium.

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H 'Tributaries', drawing and writing in landscape: talk at Landscape and Place symposium hosted by the Landscape and Art Network.

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H Tributaries: public presentation at the Midsummer Poetry Festival.

  • Tucker JA 'Tributaries: contemporary collaborations with neo-romanticism' talk at Landscape and Uncertainty.

  • Tucker JA, Tarlo H 'Between Lines in Space: drawing and writing in landscape' talk at Excavations and Estuaries Seminar..

PhD & Postdoctoral Supervision

Current PhD Student Supervision

Hondartza Fraga, Uncalibrated Melancholy: Science, Art and the Contemporary Sublime, 2017-

Assel Kadryrkhanova, Postmemory in post-Soviet Kazakhstan: Art as Research, 2016-

Adam Stone, Drawing and Painting as Poiesis (lead supervisor), 2014-

John Rooney, Journeys on the A664 (lead supervisor), 2013-

Filippa Dobson, Barren (yeld): Traces of Ain – Landscape, Postcolonialism and Identity (lead supervisor), 2012-

Judith Simpson, The Clothing of the Dead, 2010-

Completed PhD Candidates

Stephen Felmingham, Drawing, Place and the Contemporary Sublime (lead supervisor), 2009-2014

Christopher Harris, Hiraeth: Designing a Welsh Identity (lead supervisor), 2008-2015

Trevor Borg, Reading Place: Exploring Deterritorialised Island Matter, 2012-2016

Links

http://www.contemporarybritishpainting.com/wordpress/?page_id=2767 http://www.projectfitties.com/

http://land2.leeds.ac.uk/people/tucker/

http://www.mappingspectraltraces.org/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_Tucker

https://vimeo.com/84864272

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